Recent Reads – The COVID-19 Edition

This month’s reads ran the gamut, from Christian fiction to heartfelt, agonizing poetry. April was the height of the stay-at-home order in Colorado, so it made finding reading time much easier. Still, I found myself distracted from my reading, drifting some amidst the tension of the time. Eventually, I got back into a groove and began enjoying my reading life even more. Has the quarantine had the same effect on any of you? Let me know in the comments.

Recent reads:

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

This is very different from my usual reading, but was recommended to me. Amazing poetry that expresses the pain of abuse, and the joy and agony of love won and lost. Kaur captures her feelings in a revealing way, with no filter. Illustrations that accompany the poems can be quite explicit. Her poetry is powerful and hard to read, but also very moving. Not for the faint of heart.

Rating: Four stars.

Desert Willow by Patricia Beal

In following Clara’s journey with Andrew, Beal tells a tender story of second chances in this Christian romance. Her portrayal of Clara is sweet as she slowly opens up after starting out so guarded. Both she and Andrew are compelling characters that tell a story that sucks you in and doesn’t let go. Read with a box of tissues!

Thank you to NetGalley and Celebrate Lit for the review copy of this book.

Rating: Four Stars

Guidebook to Murder by Lynn Cahoon

This is the first book in the Tourist Trap mystery series and follows Jill Gardner who runs a bookstore and coffee shop in South Cove, California. When her elderly friend Miss Emily is murdered, Jill inherits her dilapidated home that happens to be on prime property. While trying to figure out who killed Miss Emily, Jill is hounded by a greedy developer and threatened to sell or else by the mayor. Jill works to renovate her new home before a condemnation order by the city takes effect, and she’s assisted by the handsome Chief of Police, who is also on the case.

This was a fun book. I related well to Jill, who was slightly quirky but not in an annoying way. She is frazzled through most of the book, and you can feel the tension mounting as the city’s deadline nears and death threats start to come in. The suspense is really good, and though I had a good idea of whodunit, it was still a surprise ending and wrapped up in a satisfying way.

Rating: Four stars.

I love Joanne Fluke’s Hannah Swensen series. The mysteries are always engaging and I love to reconnect with the people from Lake Eden. This latest installment doesn’t disappoint. Hannah has to help clear her sister’s boyfriend and sheriff’s detective Lonnie of a murder he didn’t commit. The path through the book is familiar to readers of the series and can, for the most part, be read as a stand alone. You’d miss out on a lot of the backstory though. (I skipped a few books in the series and was at a loss for some of the storyline, but it didn’t affect solving the mystery).

The solution is a satisfying one, but there aren’t a whole lot of twists and turns. Should be another favorite for fans of the series. For those who haven’t met Hannah yet, I’d suggest starting at the beginning so you can really become familiar with the interrelated arcs of the characters. I’ll definitely keep reading (but I’m going to have to go back and catch up some).

Thank you to NetGalley for the electronic review copy of this book.

Rating: Five stars

I listened to this on audiobook, which I love to do with books of essays. It’s read by the author and the work comes through in a much more touching way through audio. The author shares about her life and work and family, all tied together with a quote from her son which makes the title of the book.

It’s not really a how-to, lessons on life type of book, but you certainly can learn from Philpott’s experiences. The essays give insight not only into her life, but into how we shape our lives as well. Never preachy, Philpott shares her experiences in a way that is relatable and gives you hope that your life is full of interesting experiences too.

Rating: Four stars

I listened to this on audio and I highly recommend that format.

This quirky book centers around a journal that a lonely, elderly man leaves in a coffee shop with an essay about his “authentic” life in the front. He goes on in the essay to challenge those who find it to write their authentic story and to leave the book for someone else. As the book finds new owners, a group of friends forms, betrayals and secrets are revealed, and lives are changed.

I thought the idea was original and interesting. Pooley ties the characters and storylines together well and comes up with some interesting twists. My favorite is the grandma in the art class. She’s not a main character, but her sassy nature adds some interesting spice to the book.

I rarely re-read books, but this is one I might take a look at in print or electronic form, just to see if the experience is different.

Really loved this book. Rating: Five stars

So what are you reading during this season of isolation? Has your reading life been altered in any way? Share your thoughts in the comments.

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