New Focus For Get Cozy Book Nook Plus 7 Tasty First-In-Series Food-Based Cozies

Here at Get Cozy Book Nook, I’ve focused on providing book news readers can use. As time has progressed, I find myself increasingly focus on cozy mysteries (my faves!), and so the tone of the blog is going to change. The main focus of most posts will be cozy mysteries, with some book-related content. I’ll still do my Reading Roundup, which will include books from many genres that I’ve read over the past month. Also continuing will be the Weekend Reading feature, where I share links about bookish topics, though most of the links there will focus on cozy mysteries.

So what’s a cozy mystery? Cozies generally focus on an amateur sleuth (though not always-love you Louise Penny!) solving a mystery that doesn’t show graphic violence, sex, or salty language on the page. Cozy titles are often a pun on the heart of the mystery, which can focus on anything from food to crafting to books to travel. They’re my favorite type of books. Don’t know where to start? Everyone loves a good, tasty dish, so here’s a list of the first-in-series cozies that focus on food.

Goldy Bear, a Colorado caterer, serves a meal at a wake, when her ex-father-in-law dies. Now Goldy’s accused of adding poison to the menu and must clear her name and save her burgeoning catering business.

Theodosia Browning owns Indigo Tea Shop in South Carolina and is catering tea for 200 at the historic homes garden party when a distinguished guest is found dead with a tea cup clutched in his hand. Theodosia and her staff set out to find who poisoned one of the city’s elite while trying to protect the reputation of her shop.

Hannah Swensen bakes up a Minnesota mystery when her chocolate chip crunchies are found scattered in the back alley of her bakery around the body of a delivery man. Someone’s cooking up trouble in Eden Lake, and Hannah and her friends need to find out who, before her mother sets her up with the town’s dentist and without getting in the way of the town’s newest detective. Hannah soon finds herself torn between two great guys while trying to protect her bakery after a murder just outside her doors.

Lana Lee ends up back at her family’s restaurant in Cleveland’s Asian Village after a bad breakup, when the property manager winds up dead after a delivery from her family’s restaurant. Lana has to solve the mystery before she ends up the next victim.

When Haley Snow applies to by a food critic at a Key West lifestyle magazine, she doesn’t know that her boss would be Kristen Faulkner, the woman she caught with her boyfriend. Then Kristen turns up murdered, and Haley is the prime suspect in the key lime pie poisoning. She has to find the real killer before she becomes a victim herself.

When Bronwyn “Win” Crewse reopened her family’s renovated ice cream shop, she finds a body just down the hill only days after opening. Not just any body, the body of a man who tried to swindle her grandma out of her own shop. Then Win’s father becomes a prime suspect, and she reluctantly embarks on her own investigation with her friend Maisie. This one’s got a cast full of quirky characters, secrets, and a whole lot of ice cream. Will Win and Maisie figure out who the killer is before the killer melts them?

Winona Mae Montgomery and her Granny Smythe run the struggling Smythe Orchards. They cook up an old-fashioned Christmas festival at the orchard to bring in locals and tourists. Things are sweet until Granny’s nemesis Nadine Cooper is found lodged in the apple press. Granny’s the number one suspect, and she and Winona must find the rotten apple before someone else ends up cooked.

Felicia runs a food truck business and gets steamed when everyone dismisses her suspicions when unlikeable retiree Mrs. Dunn passes out while walking home from Felicia’s truck. She’s sure someone’s cooking up trouble and she’s determined to find out the French fried truth.

If you’re down for a tale where mystery’s brewing, one (or all!) of these books could be for you. Murder can happen anywhere in a cozy: a small town, a big city, or right outside your shop door. Join me as I steer this blog toward a new and mysterious adventure in book loving. Keep coming back for more cozies and book-related content.

Happy reading!

–Amy

Reading Roundup February 2021

This month was a slow reading month. After finishing nearly ten books last month, I only finished four books, three of them audio books. The short month seemed to fly by. I’m in the middle of three books, so March’s book total should go back up. Here’s my February book haul:

28 Summers by Elin Hilderbrand

Elin Hilderbrand has done it again. Even though I read this in the wintertime, I was transported to Nantucket for 28 summers of a beautiful love affair. Mallory and Jake have a “Same time next year” relationship where they only get together on Labor Day each year and recreate their first weekend together. The affair carries on through all the ups and downs of their lives, with a stunning conclusion.

Hilderbrand shows her characters’ full personalities, flaws and all, but there are no demons in this book. She always finds the balance in each character without making them flat and unmemorable.

The setting, the characters, and the plotting of the book all meld together into one unforgettable story. I listened to this on audio and recommend it, though it is a big time commitment.

Rating: Five stars!

Who I Am With You by Robin Lee Hatcher

I read this for our church book club and it didn’t disappoint. The story was sweet and jumped back and forth in time between contemporary times, featuring a young, pregnant widow and her neighbor, who’s gotten himself into political hot water, and the Depression, with the love story of the heroine’s great grandfather and grandmother.

I love the time switch aspect and how the stories mirrored each other. Things seemed to develop naturally in the plot and there weren’t many twists. You can sort of predict the ending, but it is so much fun getting there!

Rating: 4 stars

Killer Content by Olivia Black

This book is not a typical cozy. It follows Odessa Dean, a temporary Brooklyn transplant from small-town Louisiana. Odessa’s is a waitress at a book store and cafe when her fellow waitress Bethany leaves mid shift to meet some on in Domino Park and mysteriously falls from a medium high bridge to her death. Odessa is convinced it was murder and sets out to investigate.

Odessa is a great character, not your usual mystery heroine. She’s young and in the city for the first time, so the reader gets to follow not only the mystery, but her journey to find her place in New York. There are places in the middle of the book where the mystery seems to be forgotten for a bit and the pace slows, but towards the end the action ramps up to a fever pitch with an unpredictable ending. It kept me guessing.

What also kept me guessing was that there was no real love interest developed for Odessa. This is probably intentional, but I kept waiting for it to develop and it never did. Even the handsome detective ends up with someone else.

The book gets into the tech without getting too techy. I liked the relevance of that.

Overall, I really liked this book, even if it didn’t shout out as an all-time fav. I would definitely read the next one in the series.

Thank you to NetGalley for the complimentary electronic copy of this book. All opinions are my own.

Rating: 4 stars

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

“Somewhere between life and death, there is a library.” After an extended depression, a job loss, and the death of her cat, Nora decides to overdose, only to find herself in a library with her childhood librarian. In the library, she looks through her Book of Regrets. She then has the opportunity to choose any of the books that will allow her to face one of her regrets and live an alternate version of her life based on a decision she made differently.

I found the premise fascinating. Most people have wondered what their lives would be like if they had made different choices at different times in their lives. After all, what would lead to the perfect life? The journey Nora goes on is interesting and unpredictable, as is the ending.

The whole concept doesn’t fit with my spiritual beliefs, but was an interesting exercise in looking at alternative beliefs. The characters are rich and vibrant and the events are believable, but unexpected. It can be difficult to read at times, but it is definitely compelling.

I listed to this on audio and finished it in two evenings. I think the audio version adds another layer of “personalness” to the book.

I recommend this book to anyone who likes the “sliding doors” concept in a book.

Rating: 4 stars

I may not have read a lot of books in February, but each of these books was impactful. And, as I said above, I have three books in progress, plus two audio books, so I’m off to a good start for March.

What did you read in February? Have you read any of the above books? If so, what did you think of them? Share in the comments below.

Happy reading!

–Amy

Keep the Romance Alive: Seven Books For Your Valentine’s (or Galentine’s) Day Hangover

Love is still in the air, even though Valentine’s Day was two days ago (and Galentine’s was three days ago). Whether you celebrate the Hallmark holiday of romantic love (based on a story with Christian roots), or are through with relationships, there’s a romance for you. Some are steamy, others tame, and still others take the hate-to-love trope VERY seriously, but all of them have happy endings. If you’ve found your happy ending with someone else, or are happy all by yourself, thank you very much, here are seven books that will make you say “what if…”

Steam level ratings:

1-No love scenes; 2-Closed door love scenes; 3. Semi open door but not overtly specific love scenes; 4. Open door love scenes; 5. Steamy, specific open door love scenes.

If You Believe In Long Lost Love

Out of the Storm by B.J. Daniels

Kate Jackson never believed her husband died in the Texas refinery explosion 20-some years ago. But she’s moved on with fiancé Collin, and takes a trip with him to Montana to see the snow for the first time. Their rental breaks down in the small town of Buckhorn, where she meets a man she swears is her long lost husband Danny. Except his “real” name is Justin and he’s got a secret of his own. Collin is thrown by this turn of events and the trip goes south. As Collin and Kate head into danger, can “Justin” save the woman he’s falling in love with, without getting himself killed in the process? First in.a series.

Steam level: One level three scene

If You Have A Steamy Secret Crush…

Real Men Knit by Kwana Jackson

When Mama Strong dies, leaving behind her failing knitting shop, serial heartbreaker Jesse tries to convince the other Strong foster brothers to save the business. The cozy knitting shop has a strong sense of community, and Jesse doesn’t want to see that lost.

Part-time employee Kerry has grown up with the boys and has always harbored a secret crush on Jesse. As they spend time together, their chemistry is undeniable. But can it last?

Steam level: Definitely a four.

If You’re a Single Mom With Faith and Dreams…

The Prayer Box by Lisa Wingate

Single mom Tandi Jo Reese finds herself going through the belongings of a late, long-time resident of Hatteras Island while trying to raise a rebellious daughter and a withdrawn son. As she begins to clean out the house, she learns more about the life and love story of the woman who lived there. Tandi Jo is currently in a relationship with a wealthy but demanding man, but begins to put roots down on the island and starts a growing friendship with her son’s science teacher as she regains her independence. The house is threatened with a forced sale and her neglected children’s lives begin to go off the rails, she must save her son and daughter, save the house she’s grown to love, and decide whether or not to open her heart.

Steam level: One, this is a Christian fiction story (not strictly romance, but has romantic themes)

For Fans Of Jane Austen And The Bachelor

Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld

A modern day retelling of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice set in modern day Cincinnati. Liz and her older sister Jane return to their family home after her father has a health scare. Studious Mary and their younger sisters Kitty and Lydia (who are way into CrossFit) also live there.

Enter new doctor-in-town Chip Bingley, fresh off a stint on the reality dating show Eligible and his reserved and cranky friend Fitzwilliam Darcy. Chip and Jane hit it off immediately, Liz and Darcy, not so much. But in this combination story of true love and hate-to-love, first impressions can be deceiving.

Steam level: Definitely a four, leaning toward five. Not your mother’s Pride and Prejudice.

If You Believe True Love Can Conquer All…

The Return by Nicholas Sparks

It doesn’t get more traditionally mushy, and dramatically romantic than Nicholas Sparks. Trevor Benson is a veteran and surgeon with PTSD moving back to New Bern, North Carolina. He was injured and can’t perform surgery anymore and struggles with demons from his time in Afghanistan. When his grandfather dies and leaves Trevor his home, he must decide what to do with the place.

Then he falls in love at first sight with town sheriff Natalie Masterson. But she has a secret that’s keeping them apart. Can their love overcome it? I think we all know the answer.

Steam level: One, maybe two if I remember right, but could just be one.

If You’re Staunchly Single, But Love A Meet Cute…

The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory

The first in a series of interconnected romances, The Wedding Date begins when happily single Alexa Monroe meets Drew Nichols when the two are stuck in an elevator. Drew asks Alexa to be his date to his ex’s wedding and she accepts. They have more fun than they can imagine, but have to return to their high-powered careers, Alexa as the mayor’s chief of staff in Berkeley, and Drew as a doctor in Los Angeles. Can this long-distance romance work, or are they headed for a disaster? What happens when what you think you need doesn’t always match up with what you truly want?

Steam level: Definitely four, leaning strongly toward five.

If You Love A Good Wedding Story…

Vision In White by Nora Roberts (First in Bride Quartet series)

Nora Roberts is one of the queens of romance fiction and can’t be forgotten in this list. The first installment of the series focuses on Mackenzie “Mac” Elliot, who is an experienced photographer who owns a successful wedding planning business with three close friends. She has a rocky relationship with her parents and is skeptical about romance. Then she runs into Carter, an old high school classmate, and a relationship is sparked. Their journey is endearing, with some steamy love scenes and a satisfying ending.

Steam factor: Four or five depending on the scene.

As the Valentine’s candy in stores is replaced with Easter candy, its easy to feel some whiplash after weeks of buildup to a romantic day-of-all-days. But romance remains strong long after the boxes of chocolate are empty and the conversation hearts go stale(r). I’m a big believer in the escape that romantic fiction can provide. My first love will always be the cozy mystery, but a close second is a good, mushy or sassy, and smart romance novel.

Do you have a favorite romance? Or do you hate all romantic fiction? Somewhere in between? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Recent Reads 12.1.2020 – August/September

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted a reading round up so this is Part One – August/September. So hearken back with me to late summer/early fall, when the the sun was still blazing before the breeze picked up too much. When we made the switch from flip flops and sandals to sneakers and (some days up here in the mountains) boots. When everything moves from soft and breezy to cozy and crisp. Now that you’re there with me, here are some books I read during that time:

Nacho Average Murder by Maddie Day

What a fun book set in a great location (Santa Barbara)) for a summer read. Robbie is on vacation For her ten year high school reunion and comes across information that her mother, who died of a brain aneurysm, might have been murdered instead. Before she knows it, she’s trying to sort out a feud with a high school nemesis, a toxic chemical, and an old friend trying to get her life together. This has a few twist and turns with no shortage of clues. I liked the ending but kept expecting one more twist that left me feeling a little unsettled. Would definitely recommend.

Thank you to NetGalley for the Review copy of the book. All opinions are my own. Rating: Four stars

Paris Never Leaves You by Ellen Feldman

I love this book! I’m not usually a big fan of World War II books, but this one really grabbed me from the very first line. The characters of Charlotte, Horace, And Julian have strong depth. I felt like I was right there for every raid, every kiss. The tension was palpable and the choices Charlotte has to make are wrenching. Charlotte’s daughter Vivi was a bright light and I liked the journey of her character. Very compelling! Not an easy read, but it pulls you in and won’t let you go. I highly recommend it! Rating: Five stars 

Thank you to St. Martin’s Griffin Press and NetGalley for the review copy of this book.

Leaning Out: An Alternative Perspective for the Modern Corporate Woman by Monica E. Pierce (Audiobook)

This was an interesting perspective on the corporate work world for women. It explores the question: what about women who want to foster a balance in their lives and don’t want to go for the corner office. Leaning out is not giving up on any ambition, but is a balance of ambition and family/personal life. 

I’m one who has always leaned out so I could relate. It agues strongly for choice in the work world. A good read, but dragged in some spots. (listen- I listened on audio).

Thank you to NetGalley for the review audiobook. All opinions are my own. Rating: Three stars

Christmas Carol Society by Rebekah Jones

I LOVE Christmas stories. This one was an especially fun one. A riff on the Dickens story, the author did a good job of taking the twist and creating an inspiring story full of faith. Charlie’s story was compelling and kept me reading. This would be a great addition to anyone’s Christmas reading list. Start the season early when this one comes out.

Thank you to Celebrate Lit and NetGalley for the review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.

Rating: Four stars

September

Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly by Anthony Bourdain (Audiobook)

Bourdain provided a deep dive behind the scenes of some of New York City’s famous (Rainbow Room) and not so famous restaurant kitchens. A gritty (and foul-mouthed) look at what it’s like in the militaristic hierarchy on the kitchen line, Bourdain shows the interesting, and sometimes ugly, side of where upscale food is made. He minces no words about his own experiences starting as a dishwasher and working his way up to chef in various restaurants. The book was written while he was chef at Les Halles, before he went on to host his own travel-food show on CNN. He outlines his successes, his many failures, and the inner workings of restaurants. The book is filled with colorful characters (many pseudonyms are used) unique insights into human character, especially his own.

Some parts of the book unappealingly gritty or revealing, but anyone who’s ever thought that they wanted to be a chef (not me, especially not now) needs to read this book. It also a good book for restaurant patrons who want to be “in the know” about the origins and etiquette surrounding their food.

I listened to the audiobook version of this, which is narrated by Bourdain whose own voice adds more life to his words. I recommend it. Rating: Four stars

The Fifth Avenue Story Society by Rachel Hauck

I chose this book for my church book group (Faith Fiction Fans-woo!) because it had a bookish theme and a thread of a faith story that wound through it. The book follows five people who get mysterious invitations to a story society at a book shop on Fifth Avenue: a professor who is trying to finish his dissertation on a famous writer, his ex-wife who is struggling to get the recognition she deserves at her job, a cosmetics company owner who almost became a princess, an Uber driver trying to reconnect with his kids, and an older gentleman who wants to write the story of his ideal marriage.

As the group continues to meet weekly, secrets are shared and each person grows in unexpected ways. The faith storyline is deftly thread into the story without being overbearing. The characters are likable and unlikeable in turn and every time you think you know what’s going to happen, a twist gets thrown in.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, especially the characters of the professor and the cosmetics company owner. The bond the group forms is realistic and close and reflects the same connection I have with my book group.

Rating: Four stars

Girl Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals by Rachel Hollis (Audiobook)

I listened to this on audio, which I recommend as the way to consume this book. It was a great motivational book that helps you to let go of excuses and to train your behaviors for success. It’s about dreaming big and setting big goals. I felt like some of it applied to my life, while some of it was focused on creating a business that is scaled way up (which is not my goal). Still, she shares her experiences and has some good advice for anyone who has some ambition to build a business or just expand your experiences in life.

This book is aimed at women, so many men may not be able to relate to some of the advice. Not the end-all, be-all of self help books, but some great motivational tips and ways to set yourself up for success.

Rating: Four stars

Spies and Sweethearts by Linda Shenton Matchett

I love a good spy story, and this was a fun one. Throw in romance and the World War Two era, and you’ve got a great suspense novel. The author did a great job making the setting come to life and really breathed life into the characters. They were interesting and I really cared about their story. The suspense was just right, put you on the edge of your seat without going overboard. It’s the tried and true hate-to-love trope without being tired and worn. This is book one of a trilogy, and I intend to come back for the next two installments.

Thank you to Celebrate Lit and NetGalley for the review ebook copy. All opinions are my own.

Rating: Four stars

Cost Minimalist Home: More Style, Less Stuff by Myquillyn Smith

I loved the style in this book. I’ve been looking for a way to describe my aesthetic and this is it. It was also nice to learn some decorating techniques that I can use with what I have. Definitely getting her next book.

Rating: Five stars

If I Run (If I Run #1) by Terri Blackstock

What a thriller! Terri Blackstock really knows how to move the plot along in this Christian thriller. This is the first of the three book series where we follow Casey, who is on the run because she is a suspect in her best friend Brent’s murder, and Dylan, the victim’s childhood friend who is hired to find Casey and bring her back to the police. 

As Casey starts on a journey to discover who is responsible for Brent’s murder and for framing her, she also begins a journey toward faith. Childhood pain, the loneliness of being on the run, and Casey’s good heart will help the reader start putting the pieces together. Dylan’s is also suspicious of the evidence that sets Casey up as a suspect and starts to discover the real truth behind the murder. As he works to manage his PTSD and to find Casey, he relies on his faith to get him to the truth.

Be sure you have the second two books queued up so you can read (or listen to- I took it in as an audiobook) them right after you finish this one. You won’t want to wait.

Rating: Five stars

Stay tuned tomorrow for my October-November reads, followed Friday by a special Holiday Gift Guide edition of Weekend Reading on Friday.

Happy reading!

— Amy

Reading Roundup 6.16.20

I’ve been trying to diversify my reading list, both racially and genre-wise and I think this set of reads is a good start. This was a pretty good month for books, and each one was a hit in its own way.

Becoming Mrs. Lewis by Patti Callahan

This was a fascinating tale of the love story between Joy Davidson and C.S. Lewis. Told from the point of view of Joy, it follows the disintegration of her first marriage and her friendship that grows into love, with “Jack” (C.S. Lewis). Davidson was a writer and began writing Lewis in the later stages of her marriage, curious about Christianity.

The book was clearly well researched and is a good assumption of what Joy’s point of view would have been during those times. There is an accompanying podcast that includes an interview with one of her sons, who curates her collection of papers at Wheaton College.

This was at times hard to read, and Joy isn’t always the most lovable character, but it tells of a great love between two outstanding writers. Rating: A

The Honey-Don’t List by Christina Lauren

This romp follows the assistants to America’s favorite (fictional) home renovation couple Melissa and Rusty Tripp as they set off on a book tour that is leading up to the premiere of their new HGTV show. The Tripps are pushing their new book on marriage, but the public doesn’t know that they can’t stand each other. Melissa is a control freak and Rusty plays the goofy sidekick to her supposedly sensible approach. As the tension mounts, sparks start to fly between assistants Carey and James.

This book was stressful to read, but at the same time engrossing. It’s like watching a train wreck and not being able to look away. The story is compelling and it’s easy to get invested in all the characters. The ending was a complete surprise, but fit well with the rest of the book. Rating: A- (only because it was a bit stressful to read).

Cozy Case Files, A Cozy Mystery Sampler, Volume 9

What a fun compilation, I enjoyed all the previews and will be picking some of them up. I especially enjoyed Nothing Bundt Trouble, The Secretof the Bones, The Art of Deception, and A Royal Affair. I will also definitely choose the next volume of this series. It’s a great way to find some good reads,

Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a free review copy.

Fierce, Free, and Full of Fire by Jen Hatmaker

Jen Hatmaker takes a stand in this book for standing in your truth. A former speaker in the Evangelical Christian sphere, Hatmaker shares her journey to what she calls the freedom to be who she is. Hatmaker recently called for the complete inclusion of the LGBTQ community in the Christian community and was ostracized for her stance, losing much of her career. This book is the result of what she learned from the struggle to find her truth and what others need to know to honor their own truth. This is not a memoir or a self-help book, but more the result of self-discovery and research into social psychology. Rating: B+

The Pretty One: On Life, Pop Culture, Disability, and Other Reasons to Fall in Love With Me by Keah Brown

I listened to this book on audio and I’m glad I did. I think it added to the experience of the memoir to hear the author’s own voice. Brown shares the intimate details of her experience with being disabled and coming to an acceptance of herself. She takes the reader (listener) on a journey with her through the ups and downs of being a black, disabled woman journalist. Her writing style is earnest and enjoyable, though your heart breaks during some of the really tough parts. Rating: A

This Wandering Heart by Janine Rosche

This work of Christian fiction tells the story of how geography teacher Keira Knudsen finds a home. After turning down a proposal from her longtime boyfriend and principal of the school, Keira dons her alternative identity of travel blogger Kat Wanderfull and takes a trip. She is offered the travel opportunity of a lifetime. Meanwhile, her first love Robbie faces a challenge when the mother of his daughter reappears and wants custody. Keira and Robbie form a partnership to get them each what they want. But secrets threaten to tear their growing relationship apart.

I loved the unique angle of this story. Kat isn’t just a damsel in need of a man and Robbie’s not just the ruggedly handsome man she left behind. They each have depth that carries the story forward. The ending is satisfying and not totally predictable. Each faces realistic obstacles that can be truly heart wrenching. The plot kept me reading and interested until the very end. Definitely one I’d recommend.

Thank you to Celebrate Lit and NetGalley for the review copy.

I’ve got several books I’m reading this month: The Prayer Box, Hello, Summer, One Perfect Summer, Deadly Sweet Tooth, Nacho Average Murder, The Chiffon Trenches

Happy Reading!

–Amy

Recent Reads – The COVID-19 Edition

This month’s reads ran the gamut, from Christian fiction to heartfelt, agonizing poetry. April was the height of the stay-at-home order in Colorado, so it made finding reading time much easier. Still, I found myself distracted from my reading, drifting some amidst the tension of the time. Eventually, I got back into a groove and began enjoying my reading life even more. Has the quarantine had the same effect on any of you? Let me know in the comments.

Recent reads:

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

This is very different from my usual reading, but was recommended to me. Amazing poetry that expresses the pain of abuse, and the joy and agony of love won and lost. Kaur captures her feelings in a revealing way, with no filter. Illustrations that accompany the poems can be quite explicit. Her poetry is powerful and hard to read, but also very moving. Not for the faint of heart.

Rating: Four stars.

Desert Willow by Patricia Beal

In following Clara’s journey with Andrew, Beal tells a tender story of second chances in this Christian romance. Her portrayal of Clara is sweet as she slowly opens up after starting out so guarded. Both she and Andrew are compelling characters that tell a story that sucks you in and doesn’t let go. Read with a box of tissues!

Thank you to NetGalley and Celebrate Lit for the review copy of this book.

Rating: Four Stars

Guidebook to Murder by Lynn Cahoon

This is the first book in the Tourist Trap mystery series and follows Jill Gardner who runs a bookstore and coffee shop in South Cove, California. When her elderly friend Miss Emily is murdered, Jill inherits her dilapidated home that happens to be on prime property. While trying to figure out who killed Miss Emily, Jill is hounded by a greedy developer and threatened to sell or else by the mayor. Jill works to renovate her new home before a condemnation order by the city takes effect, and she’s assisted by the handsome Chief of Police, who is also on the case.

This was a fun book. I related well to Jill, who was slightly quirky but not in an annoying way. She is frazzled through most of the book, and you can feel the tension mounting as the city’s deadline nears and death threats start to come in. The suspense is really good, and though I had a good idea of whodunit, it was still a surprise ending and wrapped up in a satisfying way.

Rating: Four stars.

I love Joanne Fluke’s Hannah Swensen series. The mysteries are always engaging and I love to reconnect with the people from Lake Eden. This latest installment doesn’t disappoint. Hannah has to help clear her sister’s boyfriend and sheriff’s detective Lonnie of a murder he didn’t commit. The path through the book is familiar to readers of the series and can, for the most part, be read as a stand alone. You’d miss out on a lot of the backstory though. (I skipped a few books in the series and was at a loss for some of the storyline, but it didn’t affect solving the mystery).

The solution is a satisfying one, but there aren’t a whole lot of twists and turns. Should be another favorite for fans of the series. For those who haven’t met Hannah yet, I’d suggest starting at the beginning so you can really become familiar with the interrelated arcs of the characters. I’ll definitely keep reading (but I’m going to have to go back and catch up some).

Thank you to NetGalley for the electronic review copy of this book.

Rating: Five stars

I listened to this on audiobook, which I love to do with books of essays. It’s read by the author and the work comes through in a much more touching way through audio. The author shares about her life and work and family, all tied together with a quote from her son which makes the title of the book.

It’s not really a how-to, lessons on life type of book, but you certainly can learn from Philpott’s experiences. The essays give insight not only into her life, but into how we shape our lives as well. Never preachy, Philpott shares her experiences in a way that is relatable and gives you hope that your life is full of interesting experiences too.

Rating: Four stars

I listened to this on audio and I highly recommend that format.

This quirky book centers around a journal that a lonely, elderly man leaves in a coffee shop with an essay about his “authentic” life in the front. He goes on in the essay to challenge those who find it to write their authentic story and to leave the book for someone else. As the book finds new owners, a group of friends forms, betrayals and secrets are revealed, and lives are changed.

I thought the idea was original and interesting. Pooley ties the characters and storylines together well and comes up with some interesting twists. My favorite is the grandma in the art class. She’s not a main character, but her sassy nature adds some interesting spice to the book.

I rarely re-read books, but this is one I might take a look at in print or electronic form, just to see if the experience is different.

Really loved this book. Rating: Five stars

So what are you reading during this season of isolation? Has your reading life been altered in any way? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Get Cozy Book Nook: New Name, New Focus

Writer Without a Space has a new name and a new focus! Welcome to the Get Cozy Book Nook. Because so many of my posts focused on books, book reviews, reading, and the reading life, I thought the name of the blog should reflect that content.

But it’s more than just a name change. Get Cozy Book Nook is a place where you can come for book reviews and news readers can use. In the coming months, you’ll find roundups of recent reads, seasonal book previews, updates on interesting news in the world of publishing, tips on making your reading life more enjoyable, and (hopefully) some author interviews.

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What I’ve Been Reading Lately

With all the “extra” time we all have while we’re sheltering in place, I have had a difficult time focusing on reading. I’ve heard the same thing from some other bloggers and people in my life. I’m not sure if I’m distracted because of all the COVID-19 news (I’m a news writer by night, so I write a lot about the virus), or if it’s just a reaction to being trapped inside for so much time. I’m still reading, but my pace has really slowed. If you’re looking for an escape from the current crisis, try one of these:

7: An Experimental Mutiny Against Excess by Jen Hatmaker

I love Jen Hatmaker as an author. She has a great voice and a nice amount of snark (without being mean). The book was well written, and interesting. I also like the idea behind this project: to cut the excess from your life. And it was interesting to read through her experiences. It clearly took a lot of effort and hard work to put together this book.

What struck me with this book was the rhythm of it: summary of challenge, confession, good things, gripes, challenging information about how awful we all are in that area of our lives, final summary. Each of the chapters followed this rhythm and it got a bit repetitive and predictable.

I appreciated the information she shared, but it almost sounded like it came from a position of privilege. It’s easier to cut down to seven areas of spending when you have more than seven to begin with. It also would be difficult to meet some of these challenges in areas that don’t have organic markets or a lot of places to regularly buy local.

I think Ms. Hatmaker wrote this book from a place of good intention and performed each challenge with the best of everything in mind. I just think the execution of the book didn’t do justice to her efforts or translate well into other people’s experiences.

I will continue to read books by this author, because I really like her writing style and point of view. This one just didn’t click with me.

Who Murdered Mr. Malone? by Hope Callaghan

I love cozy mysteries, and this Christian cozy mystery doesn’t disappoint. The characters are interesting and the mystery is plotted pretty well. I liked getting to know the “garden girls club” and following their adventure together. This is the first in a series, so I would definitely read the next one. I will say the ending was not what I expected, and I’m not sure if I liked it or not. But the rest of the book was worth it and I’m guessing some questions will be answered and characters fleshed out in the next book.

Don’t Overthink It by Anne Bogel

I love Anne Bogel’s approach to life in this book. It may seem like a small thing, but overthinking can be really draining. Bogel offers practical tips that work for any lifestyle and budget. She includes helpful questions at the end of each chapter to prompt the reader to explore the topic in their lives more deeply (without overthinking it). I look forward to her next book and am a big fan of her blog Modern Mrs. Darcy and the What Should I Read Next? Podcast. 

**Thank you to Netgalley and Anne Bogel for the review copy. I also bought a copy of the book.**

I’ve got plenty of books on my TBR, and plan to work through seven of them this month. What are your reading goals? How has your reading life been going? Comment below with your thoughts.

Happy reading!

Recent Reads: You’re Staying In, So You Might As Well Read.

Since we’re all staying home more because of COVID-19, it’s a good time to catch up on your TBR list. There are a lot of great new books coming out, but don’t forget those backlist picks. It’s also a great time to buy e-books or download them from the library (try Overdrive or Libby). Audiobooks are great choices for listening to while you’re working from home (support independent bookstores through Libro.fm).

Here are some of my recent reads (just a few this time):

This is a dark, but interesting story. The lead FBI agent Elsa Myers is on the case of the disappearance of Ruby. The case blows up into the hunt for a serial kidnapper and killer. The team Myers is working with sorts through the clues and information to try to find the man who has kidnapped and killed girls in sets of three. During this race against time, Elsa is triggered by her own past as she tries to care for and reconcile with her father, who is dying. As the case ramps up, the third kidnapping makes it personal.

This can be a hard book to read at times, because of the dark subject matter. Elsa is a well-developed, complex character who is hardly predictable. The supporting cast on the team as well as her sister and niece play pivotal roles that lead Elsa down a twisted road to solve the case and resolve her feelings about her past.

I can’t say this book was enjoyable, because of the focus on child kidnapping and abuse. But it was interesting and a good read. I would recommend the author’s future books. Just follow it up with something light.

**Thank you to NetGalley for the e-book review copy in exchange for an honest review.**


This is the third book in the St. Caroline series. I haven’t read the others, but this can be read as a stand alone. Cassidy Trevor is off limits to Matt Wolfe, but when the two are thrown together the chair a holiday event. Their experience becomes a secret friendship that blossoms into love. 

In this somewhat spicy book, the author creates clearly drawn characters that are interesting and fun. The reason they’re “off limits” to each other seems a bit contrived, but the storyline is generally believable. You find yourself rooting for Matt and Cassidy as the story comes to a satisfying end. 

I’m guessing I would have understood all the relationships in the book a lot more easily in I’d read the first two books. 

This is a good, fun, enjoyable escape with some spice for those who like that.

Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC of the e-book in exchange for an honest review.

I love a great cozy mystery, and this one didn’t disappoint. Sammy runs a community crafting store and must involve her cousin Heidi and sister Ellie (who together make up the S.H.E.s) when a woman dies while posing as a live mannequin in Sammy’s window display during the Fire and Ice festival in Hartford, WI.

This book kept me guessing. I’m usually pretty good at guessing the killer by about halfway through, but this one took a little longer. There are some good suspenseful scenes that turn the plot on its head and were great ways to speed along the story through the middle. (No saggy middle here!)

The ending left me with a few questions, but overall it was satisfying. This is the third book in the series, and while it wasn’t hard to read as a standalone, I think some of the characterization would have been easier to understand if you have read the first two books.

A delightful author. I’d love to read more by her.

Thank you to NetGalley for the review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.